Leo's Technical Blog

Back to Linux

Introduction

user

Leo Soto


me

Back to Linux

Posted by Leo Soto on .
Featured

me

Back to Linux

Posted by Leo Soto on .

I'm back to Linux as my main OS. As you can infer from previous posts, I was using Windows on the past months. In fact, I was using Windows since I bought my Dell Laptop, a year and half ago. It wasn't just Windows: I used cygwin and coLinux inside my Windows XP to have a reasonable development environment too (except for Java, which feels OK for me on plain Windows). Somehow I survived running that all this time, forced in part because I had to use some Windows-only VPN-client software on my job.

Two weeks ago things changed. I did some backups, ran GParted (couldn't find my laptop's recovery disk, so my original plan of wiping out Windows and reinstalling everything couldn't go ahead) to shrink the NTFS partition, checked that everything was OK and installed Ubuntu Linux.

Choosing Ubuntu was a new thing: I started ten years ago with Redhat and changed to Debian “sid” five or six years ago (apt-get was such an important advantage on that times). But now I had little time to fight with my particular hardware configuration and heard that Ubuntu ran very good on Dell laptops. So I tried it and I'm not looking back.

The only thing that wasn't automatically configured was my broadcom wireless card. Hey, having to deal with only one driver issue looked very promising to me (but it will drive away people who expects everything running out of the box, anyway). Installing b43-fwcutter and following the instructions made me a happy user. But all that could be caused by me installing a non-final version of the distribution.

The overall impression is great. I'm even sticking to Gnome. Always used KDE in the past, but the default gnome environment seems very functional and I have nothing to say against it. And compiz is a great way to impress people :). Frankly, I miss konqueror versatility. But, considering that I would use Firefox as my main browser anyway (basically because it has great extensions; I don't like it eagerness for memory), that's no big deal.

Migrating things from my coLinux filesystem couldn't be easiest: just moving files, and everything (emacs, latex, gnucash, mercurial, svn) works.

Above all, having an unix-like environment is priceless.

If FlexBuilder 2 had a Linux version, it would be perfect. Perhaps too perfect to be real.